Monday, March 23, 2020

Sun spots


Tuesday, March 24

Colossians 1:12-13

[T]hanks to the Father, who has enabled you to share in the inheritance of the saints in the light. He has rescued us from the power of darkness and transferred us into the kingdom of his beloved Son.

Sun spots

Go sit in the light. The sun just came out as I write this. Snow from late Sunday melts among green shoots of the day lilies. Spring whispers her promise that winter is about to lose its grip.

So find a place where sunlight finds you. A window where the light streams through is especially welcome. So is a walk.

But sitting is best … or standing still.

We need to feel light, warmth, penetrating. It’s liquid hope, filling the inner reservoir of our hearts.

So go sit in the light until you feel a smile rising within and finding its way to your face, spreading there.

And know, we live in the light that shines from eternity. That sun warming you is one expression of the Father of all Lights, the Enveloping Love who is looking for ways to embrace you.

Let him.

Pr. David L. Miller

Saturday, March 21, 2020

Whatever, whatever


Psalm 23:6

Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me
   all the days of my life,
and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord
   my whole life long.

Wherever, whatever

Life is a journey of unknowing. Surely, we feel that now. It’s undeniable.

We do not know what’s coming next. We don’t know when the present crisis will release its grip. We don’t know exactly how it will affect us, our job, our town, our church.

The darkness of unknowing turns some to fear, and others to the Great Heart who says, “Be still, and know.”

This Voice speaks peace deep within our being and reminds us there is something, no, Someone who holds us … and every future we will ever know.

We dwell in the house of the Lord, in the house of Everlasting Love … no matter where the currents of time carry us. For this earth, this universe, the reality we share … is the Lord’s house, the place Love lives and moves, enveloping every moment of time and space.

Breathe. Just breathe in this awareness, and you will know what is sure amid every unknowing.

Whatever comes … you live in the house of Lord, the land of the Beloved, whose mercy and goodness attend every step of your journey.

Pr. David L. Miller

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Thursday, March 12, 2020

You know



He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation; for in him all things in heaven and on earth were created, things visible and invisible … all things have been created through him and for him. He himself is before all things, and in him all things hold together.
(Colossians 1:15-17)

You know

Let fear be gone. Let anxiety vanish. Let joy rise and courage fill your heart like the radiant sun of early spring.

You know everything you need to live with hope and grace. For you have seen the beginning of time … and you know the end.

You know the One from whom you come and the One to whom you will go at the end of your earthly journey. You know the energy of life and love that holds creation together, drawing all things into unity.

Everything is destined to become one, united in the love of our Lord Jesus, the Christ.

Look at him. Just look at him. Imagine him as he reaches out to bless children, heal the sick and comfort the broken hearted. Look at his eyes as he forgives those burdened by guilt. See how he rebukes hate and turns away those who judge and condemn.

Look and know: He is the beginning and end of all things … and of each of us.

Jesus is the face of the eternal Christ, who has been working in all things since the birth of time. He reveals what will evermore be—the Eternal Love from whom we come and to whom we go.

Smile and know: The beginning is love … the end, too.

Pr. David L. Miller

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Expansive hearts


A new heart I will give you, and a new spirit I will put within you; and I will remove from your body the heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. (Ezekiel 36:26)

Expansive hearts

Real spiritual growth moves us toward being magnanimous, literally big-hearted. Anything else is an impostor.

You can know the Bible front-to-back and be able to quote a verse for every occasion, annoying your friends while doing so.

You can pray for hours, meditate on scripture and practice an array of spiritual disciplines fit for a monk, but if you heart doesn’t get roomy and expansive its all for naught. You might as well save your time.

If you have not love, the Apostle Paul says, you are nothing, and you are definitely on the wrong road, not the way of Jesus, who is the way.

A contemporary assumption, growing rapidly in recent years, is that being Christian makes you narrow, judgmental. Christianity gets portrayed as anti-gay, anti-woman, anti- science, anti-intellectual; you get the idea.

Unfortunately, some Christians, including high profile preachers, produce enough arrogant, judgmental nonsense to suggest these perceptions may be correct.  

But the real mark of faith is a new heart, an expansive, magnanimous heart that can embrace others and this crazy world God so loves.

If you’ve recently accepted or forgiven someone through a major change of heart, you can be sure God had something to do with it.

Pr. David L. Miller









                                                                                        

Monday, March 09, 2020

Never alone


Christ, however, was faithful over God’s house as a son, and we are his house if we hold firm the confidence and the pride that belong to hope. (Hebrews 3:6)

Never alone

You are not alone. You belong.

You belong to the Love who greets you every time you retreat into yourself to pray your life and name you pains, joys and hopes. In the quiet space of your prayerful heart, you meet the One who shatters the existential loneliness that haunts every human soul.

So go there and pray, but do not stay there. The life of faith is not a solitary exercise but an invitation to belong to a house Christ builds as we are drawn into him.

All of us. As we are. Old and young. Accomplished and struggling. Sick and well. Progressive and conservative. All colors and ethnicities. All.

Christ joins us to each other, one people, one house. In our gatherings, we touch and know; we exchange the peace and break the bread of life to share—together. Never alone.

Christ is lives in our togetherness, and there we know his love as surely as we touch, hand-to-hand, and feel the warmth arms about our shoulders … welcoming us home, into the community of Love he is.

We need each other. In our togetherness, we meet the One who says, “You are never alone.”
Perhaps this has never been so important, for a terrible loneliness chills the heart of our society today. 

Google the word ‘loneliness’ and you quickly discover hundreds of articles detailing the nature of loneliness, its causes and damage to our physical and emotional health.

So do not resist opportunities to worship together and meet with other believers. Receive with joy invitations to share food and drink … and your life … with others who, like you, need to feel the truth: You are never alone.

Pr. David L. Miller

Saturday, March 07, 2020

One perfect moment

The centurion sent friends to say to him, ‘Lord, do not trouble yourself, for I am not worthy to have you come under my roof…. But only speak the word, and let my servant be healed. For I also am a man set under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, “Go,” and he goes, and to another, “Come,” and he comes, and to my slave, “Do this,” and the slave does it.’ When Jesus heard this he was amazed at him, and said, … ‘I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith.’ (Luke 7:6b-9)


One perfect moment

There are perfect moments in life when exactly the right thing is said at exactly the right moment.

Such moments glisten in mind and heart, drawing our attention back to examine them again and again, reliving their joy, savoring their wisdom and marveling at how … in one exquisite instant we … or anyone … could have been so graced.

So it was for the Roman centurion who sent messengers to Jesus, seeking healing for his servant.

For one perfect moment, he epitomized what it means to be truly human and blessed. For one moment, he trusted that there is a Love that hungers to heal what is most broken in us.

For one moment he actually believed that Love would bless him and the one he loved.

For one moment he revealed the simple trust to which this extraordinary Love invites us.

His words, no, his heart reveals the trust to which Jesus invites each of us and the life God hungers to give us.

Jesus reveals the boundless heart of God, inviting us to know, truly know this Love hungers to make us whole, to heal what is broken, forgive what is wrong and assure us beyond every doubt that Love surrounds and holds us every moment, wherever we are.

“Trust me, Jesus says. Trust the One, the Love, who sent me.”

Trust, and you may just have one perfect moment … and more.

Pr. David L. Miller

One perfect moment


The centurion sent friends to say to him, ‘Lord, do not trouble yourself, for I am not worthy to have you come under my roof…. But only speak the word, and let my servant be healed. For I also am a man set under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to one, “Go,” and he goes, and to another, “Come,” and he comes, and to my slave, “Do this,” and the slave does it.’ When Jesus heard this he was amazed at him, and said, … ‘I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith.’ (Luke 7:6b-9)

One perfect moment

There are perfect moments in life when exactly the right thing is said at exactly the right moment.

Such moments glisten in mind and heart, drawing our attention back to examine them again and again, reliving their joy, savoring their wisdom and marveling at how … in one exquisite instant we … or anyone … could have been so graced.

So it was for the Roman centurion who sent messengers to Jesus, seeking healing for his servant.

For one perfect moment, he epitomized what it means to be truly human and blessed. For one moment, he trusted that there is a Love that hungers to heal what is most broken in us.

For one moment he actually believed that Love would bless him and the one he loved.

For one moment he revealed the simple trust to which this extraordinary Love invites us.

His words, no, his heart reveals the trust to which Jesus invites each of us and the life God hungers to give us.

Jesus reveals the boundless heart of God, inviting us to know, truly know this Love hungers to make us whole, to heal what is broken, forgive what is wrong and assure us beyond every doubt that Love surrounds and holds us every moment, wherever we are.

“Trust me, Jesus says. Trust the One, the Love, who sent me.”

Trust, and you may just have one perfect moment … and more.

Pr. David L. Miller

Thursday, March 05, 2020

Look to the hills

I lift up my eyes to the hills—from where will my help come? My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth. (Psalm 121:1-2)

Look to the hills

I suppose it was natural for those in earlier times to look at the rocky heights and crags of mountains and think of God. Who, after all, could create that which dwarfs mere humans? Their Creator must be greater still.

Feeling small before such immensity awakens a silent knowing of the wonder and gift of being alive, witnesses to an earth more beautiful and inspiring than anything human ingenuity can create. 

Everything … even the hard stuff … begins to feel like a gift from a Giver beyond our capacity to imagine or understand.

Why is there anything at all, we ask, and why … this? And why am I moved to such love for what my senses strain to take in?

Perhaps this wonder, this love is what the Great Giver had in mind all along. Perhaps this love and wonder is who this Mystery is.

Just so, ancient and modern hearts begin to hope that the One who fashions every stony crag through untold millennia actually loves and cares for their little lives.

But however well God etches the divine name on mountain tops, the heart of God comes most clear on a hill a bit less high where a man hung on a cross, forgiving his enemies and surrendering to the mysterious Love he called “Father.”

Golgotha is the name of that hill where Jesus gave himself for the love of a broken world … and our broken hearts … that we may look to the hills and smile. No long wondering, but knowing … what the mountains only whisper.

Pr. David L. Miller